644641 notes

Hi all! Sorry this blog has been absent recently, but we’re back! Just as a note while we get back into the swing of things, if you EVER need something tagged, please shoot us a message! We want to make sure that everyone feels comfortable and safe within the PBG community. 

Lots of love,

Suzanne

7691 notes

snow-anne:

While this post is a tad long, I hope you will lend me your ear,
because I think it is important that people understand why ‘Social Justice Warriors’, minorities and other Tumblrites can come across as overly angry or sensitive to some. I will give an example of what happens when minorities speak out against those who have power over them, in a non-anonymous, face-to-face setting. While this example is about trans people, it can easily be applied to most other minorities.

Today my brother came over for dinner. He brought up a trans woman who was not ‘passable’ and referred to her as “that man" and "he”. I’m a trans woman myself and couldn’t let him misgender a sister, so I politely corrected him. Instead of apologizing, he justified his mistake with “she looked like a man and didn’t put in enough effort”. I easily picked his words apart, having had these arguments countless times, and then asked whether he would call me a man if I were less conventionally female-looking? He answered negatively, but said the lady in question didn’t make any effort to make her voice sound more feminine. Wanting him to realize how difficult voice retraining is, I asked my brother to give me his best female voice right then and there…

He looked legitimately terrified, kind of the reaction you get when you ask a guy to hold your purse for a second. Then, the anger came. He unleashed a screaming tirade of excuses, red herrings and accusations. Trying to keep this from escalating, I carefully walked towards him with my hands in a calming gesture, hoping to calm him down. He placed his fist against my nose, yelling “one step closer, I dare you”, I froze and braced myself, having been there before. But, I got lucky, he stormed off with an angry “fine, I hate transgenders you’re all men!”.

This is why trans women are ok with you saying ‘tranny’ around them. This is why trans people don’t mind you calling them by their old name and pronouns. This is why the trans people you know personally, aren’t like those ‘crazy’ ones on Tumblr.

When we stand up for ourselves, confront people with the power and privilege they hold over us, bring to light their normally hidden prejudices, things can get ugly real fast. Again, this is not just restricted to trans people, the situation I had today can happen on any oppression axis.

For some, the internet is the only place we can speak freely without having to fear violence. Next time you think people here overreact, think about the hundreds of times they had to stay silent, clench their teeth and hold back their tears of frustration.

32566 notes
saturnineaqua:

c0ffee-craves-me:

sheer-powder:

“We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 
A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.
To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.
For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.
I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. “
—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool

saturnineaqua:

c0ffee-craves-me:

sheer-powder:

We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 

A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.

To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.

For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.

I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. “

—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool

142 notes
WTF, RAINN?
Jaclyn Friedman & Wagatwe Wanjuki
Fucking While Feminist

fuckyeahfeminists:

wagatwe:

Last week I was a guest on Jaclyn Friedman’s Fucking While Feminist podcast. We talked about rape culture, campus sexual violence, and my article that started the conversation on how f-cked up RAINN’s answer to it all is.

RAINN, one of the largest and best-funded organizations addressing sexual violence in the US, publicly advised the federal government that a) campus judicial systems are bunk, and the only answer to rape is the criminal justice system, b) there is no rape culture, and c) women should prevent rape by not carrying heavy things. Wagatwe Wanjuki, co-organizer for Ed Act Now and Feministing contributor, joins Jaclyn to try to answer the obvious questions raised by RAINN’s statements (namely, WTF?!?!?!!), and to broaden the conversation out to what campuses and the federal government should actually be doing for survivors, and to prevent more rape from happening.

Click here to listen!

Show notes:

Check it out!

(Source: jaclynfriedman.com)

103441 notes
lanadelyasss:

feminist marina is the best marina

lanadelyasss:

feminist marina is the best marina

4843 notes

How unfortunate is it that my parents had to literally force me to wear beautiful parts of my culture because I was afraid of being ostracized, but Selena Gomez can take aspects of the clothing I grew up with and make money off of them? How unfortunate is it that South Asian immigrants and South Asian Americans are Otherized every single day for the way they look, talk, and dress, but Urban Outfitters continues to commodify and make a profit off the sale of bindis – as made popular by American pop stars?

[..] My bindi is not a way for you to present yourself as being friendly to South Asian culture while exotifying it. My bindi is from my mother, put in my drawer because it is another mark of my internalized Otherness, on top of my brown skin. My bindi is tainted by Western celebrities trying to be “cultural” or “bohemian” or “tribal.” My bindi is not just a piece of plastic, my bindi is not for sale, and my bindi is not for you.

Anisha Ahuja, “Selena Gomez, What Are You Doing?”  (via ellesugars)

My mom and sister put off for YEARS getting their noses pierced, because while white women could do that and be admired for being “alternative” we would be ridiculed for being “Fresh off the Boat”.

So many visible markers of our culture that we didn’t dare wear, to the point where now I feel out of place wearing them, like they’re not meant for me. I was at a con once where a white woman wore a salwar as her costume for the prom. I can’t bring myself to wear salwar or sari to Diwali events because I feel like a fraud.

(via bossymarmalade)

(Source: feminspire)

39664 notes
Asking women to respect themselves in order to ‘earn’ the right to be treated like a human being is total horseshit. But suggesting that you have the right to treat her exactly as you please because she didn’t adhere to your archaic views of feminine propriety is misogyny, plain and simple.
— Clementine Ford  (via albinwonderland)

(Source: jkwithers)

11313 notes

wocinsolidarity:

mickyalextakesovertheworld:

Here’s the full interview.

Peirs is annoying as fuck…

Janet you are wonderful.

note that this interview, for Peirs, was not about Janet.

it was about HIS reputation, HIS extremely questionable and conditional allyship, HIS feelings, and HIS ego.

He gained nothing from the exchange. He was patronizing and condescending. He had no sympathy for her, and though he clearly understood that he has a lot privilege over Janet, he pretended not to understand why she might have been afraid to correct him (about her own identity, which she is the sole authority of) during the first interview. He kept referring to a years old Marie Claire piece that SHE DID NOT WRITE as an excuse to keep misgendering her. 

We applaud Janet for her fearlessness, her dedication, and her all around goddess status, all of which she must have needed to go back on that cretin’s show once again to represent for all the trans women of color out there.

#TEAMJANET

(Source: mickyalexander)

7732 notes

sourcedumal:

Forever side eyeing the fuck out of gay men who use misogynistic, vitriolic language toward women’s bodies but then refer to themselves with feminine pronouns and monikers as terms of endearment.

Doubletime towards white gay men who use black women’s bodies as disposable personas.